Technology Service Bundles Reduce Cost to the Consumer

Most people these days use the Internet for finding information on things, shopping for things and taking care of the mundane chore of paying their bills. They also use it to seek out the best deals on products and services.

Search engines make finding what you’re looking for much easier than in the good ol’ days of using the yellow pages. Whereas the yellow pages are fine for local listings, the world wide web opens international doors. Simply type in the keyword term, for what you want, and BINGO! you have a wealth of information right in front of you. However, it may take some time to weed through all of that information, to get at what you want out of it.

Consider these technology service related keyword examples and the results they yield on Google:

* Home Office Supplies: 450, 000, 000 results

* Satellite TV: 61, 900, 000 results

* High Speed Internet Access: 123, 000, 000 results

* VOIP: 112, 000, 000 results

* Long Distance Services: 67, 000, 000 results

* Internet Conferencing: 40, 600, 000 results

* Web Hosting: 295, 000, 000 results

* Home Security Systems: 481, 000, 000 results

If a person wanted to comparison shop for these technology services, they would spend days, even weeks, going through all of these results, in order to find the best deal on all of these services. And the businesses selling these services are hard pressed to get into the top 100, 000 of these listings, because there is so much competition.

Because of the amount of competition for individual keywords, many online businesses are attempting to create an edge over their competitors by offering multiple services, or bundled services, under one roof. By doing this, they can generate more income for themselves, and provide an environment of customer loyalty.

Take for example, insurance companies… Most major insurance companies offer more than a single type of insurance. Allstate insurance doesn’t just offer home owners insurance any more. They provide discounts to their customers who purchase more than one type of policy. For instance, you can get your home owners, auto, identity theft and other policies from them, making your life easier, your premiums smaller, and generating a larger account for Allstate. They give you more options; you buy more insurance. It is win-win for both the consumer and the company.

Another example of this is seen in consumer goods purchasing. Consumers can save time and money by going to a discount store, such as WalMart, over a department store. First of all, at the large discount store, a person can buy a wider variety of products, eliminating the need to go from specialty store to specialty store, for what they need. The company itself can buy in greater volume, reducing their own cost, and then pass that savings on to their customers.

This type of service bundling is no longer the exception in business. It is becoming more the rule and it is expanding to cover a whole new realm of consumer products and services, technology services being one of the largest.

Today, the companies who can offer a wide range of services, or access to service providers are going to become the front runners in affordability. Not only that, but they are going to be able to capture more business than their single item competitors, because they will be able to tap into multiple keyword searches, rather than simple searches for individual items.

Taking the keyword examples above; if someone were looking for information on high speed Internet access, satellite TV, and long distance services, individually, most would either give up just because the sheer numbers of results would overwhelm them into just sticking with what they’ve got, or only looking at the first few pages of results, and opting for the best deal out of those. This is particularly damaging to companies who may have the best deal to offer, but don’t appear in Google’s indexing until page 100, or so.

To make it easier on consumers and to exercise better SEO, companies are offering multiple services, grouping similar services under one domain. And the large corporations are subbing out services to smaller, independent brokers, to take advantage of the concept themselves.

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